Published On: Thu, Mar 6th, 2014

Debate on Bosman law postponed

Dutch ParliamentTHE HAGUE, WILLEMSTAD – The debate on the Bosman law in the Dutch parliament was postponed at the last minute yesterday. This is because another debate on the situation in Ukraine went too long. This is according to a report from the Caribbean Network. About 25 Antilleans traveled to The Hague, especially for the debate. They are disappointed, but have an understanding for the delay.

Deferred

Antilleans are totally against the Bosman law, which wants to establish certain requirements for citizens from Aruba, Curaçao and Sint Maarten who want to stay longer than six months in the Netherlands. The organization representing the Antilleans in the Netherlands, the OCAN, which called on all the Antilleans to come to the Dutch parliament, regrets that the debate is delayed.

Government Agreement

OCAN’s President, Glenn Helberg: “I'd like to hear what the MPs have to say about this proposal, because creating establishment requirements is set out in the coalition agreement. I want to hear how this is while many experts say that this bill is contrary to international guidelines.” He is referring to Committee on Human Rights and the Meijers Committee. Both committees have expressed their concerns about the proposal.

Political divisions

Although the debate has not yet occurred, it is clear that the political parties in parliament are divided on the bill of VVD member, André Bosman. It is clear that D66, the Christian Union and Groenlinks are against the proposal. The other parties have questioned parts of the bill, but have not rejected it. Bosman has now a little more time to try to eliminate doubts on his proposal. This is really important for the Labor Party (PvdA), they have difficulty with some parts of the bill, but are also bound by the coalition agreement. The expectation is that there will be a few adjustments to the bill, then the Labor Party will be able to agree with it. PVV and SGP are also for the bill, which creates a large majority.

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